Tag Archives: Nova Scotia

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Recent Storms Portend a Long Winter Ahead, So Time to Hit the Books

M.J. Moye

M.J. Moye

M.J. Moye is an editorial consultant and sailor who lives in Chester, Nova Scotia.
M.J. Moye

OK, so the old year left us with super-freezing temperatures and a Christmas Day nor’easter that took down trees and left us without power for almost two days. And the new year rolled in on us with an even more powerful “Bomb Cyclone” that took down more trees and killed our power for another day. That second storm was aptly name because the satellite views showed a distinct eye forming when it was off of Cape Cod. At that point the winds were already at tropical storm force here in Nova Scotia, and I knew that we were going to be in for it. Which we were. Two of my friends lost their east facing docks to the high winds, storm surge and wave action. My own dock, which is better protected from easterlies, survived the storm winds and ocean state, but the storm surge did deposit huge junks of ice across its length…fortunately, without any apparent damage. Continue reading

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While Preferring the Wild, There is Joy in Urban Sailing

M.J. Moye

M.J. Moye

M.J. Moye is an editorial consultant and sailor who lives in Chester, Nova Scotia.
M.J. Moye

I love offshore sailing and adore exploring remote wilderness coastlines up close by sailboat, but every now and then I get a kick out of urban sailing. That is, exploring the architecture developments, maritime activity, and man-made shoreline of cities. Continue reading

Moore's Island Dock

Fathoming The Mysteries Of “Ghost” Docks And Finding A Bit Of Hollywood

M.J. Moye

M.J. Moye

M.J. Moye is an editorial consultant and sailor who lives in Chester, Nova Scotia.
M.J. Moye

Perhaps the oddest dock I have ever encountered was located just outside of Greenville, North Carolina in a small pond deep in the woods near my step-grandmother’s farm. And when I say “small” I’m talking quarter acre at most. So small that you could traverse its length in a canoe with a couple of strokes of the paddle. So small that the dock, which only extended about seven feet over the water, seemed like it ended right in the middle of the pond. And ended to what purpose would be the question, as the pond was too small for boating and one could easily fish every part of it by casting from any one spot on the shore—that is, if that dock hadn’t been in the way. Continue reading