Tag Archives: Docking

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Hurricane Prep Important, but Beware the Nor’easter!

M.J. Moye

M.J. Moye

M.J. Moye is an editorial consultant and sailor who lives in Chester, Nova Scotia.
M.J. Moye

How about all of those testimonials sent in attesting to the way SlideMoor’s docking system let boats safely ride out the ravages of Hurricane Irma? And I do mean “ride out,” as SlideMoor successfully helped many of the southwest Florida region’s boats smoothly go up and down with the massive storm surge. Little doubt that the 12 or so written comments represent just a small fraction of area boat owners who experienced limited boat damage due to the SlideMoor system.  Continue reading

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Rebuilding the Wharf—Old School Style!

M.J. Moye

M.J. Moye

M.J. Moye is an editorial consultant and sailor who lives in Chester, Nova Scotia.
M.J. Moye

Prior to 2010 I pretty much left the maintenance of our wharf to other people. Herb Rafuse had long been our go-to person to repair storm and age-related damage, and had probably rebuilt the entire wharf three or four times during the 50 or so years it had been in our family. He also took care of the annual Fall/Spring haul out/hook up of our two floating docks. Continue reading

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The Art and Artistry of Docking

M.J. Moye

M.J. Moye

M.J. Moye is an editorial consultant and sailor who lives in Chester, Nova Scotia.
M.J. Moye

Docking a boat is an art, and a person who easily and smoothly brings a boat up to the dock or into a slip is generally a good boater overall. But docking should not serve as a litmus test to discern someone’s boat handling abilities, nor should boating skills serve as an indicator of one’s docking ability. In fact, there are plenty of skilled mariners whose boat hulls sport the dings, chafes and marks that serve evidence that docking skills may be less than stellar. And there are also plenty of skilled boaters who consistently depart and arrive at their own dock with ease, but who can utterly bollox things up when confronted with someone else’s dock.   Continue reading