Tag Archives: Best Sailing Blog

7 Popular Nautical Terms Explained | SlideMoor Blog

7 Popular Nautical Terms Explained

Jesse Pariseau

Jesse Pariseau

Director of Marketing & Sales at SlideMoor
I have been in the marine business since 1974. I have a BSEE from Northeastern University, specializing in Marine Sciences Instrumentation. I've been an active offshore sailor for most of my adult life having sailed a couple of Whitbread legs and way too many Bermuda races to mention!
Jesse Pariseau

Wharf Rat: (Iidem decanus et murem) – Mammalian life form usually with 4 legs, pointed snout, beady eyes, and a long tail. However, two-legged varieties have been reported in and around establishments that serve alcoholic beverages near waterfront piers, wharves, and docks. The breeding habits of the two-legged variety are suspect at best. They most often can be observed after midnight or at closing time searching for a mate. Continue reading

The Sailboat Infestation Continues! - SlideMoor Blog

The Sailboat Infestation Continues!

Jesse Pariseau

Jesse Pariseau

Director of Marketing & Sales at SlideMoor
I have been in the marine business since 1974. I have a BSEE from Northeastern University, specializing in Marine Sciences Instrumentation. I've been an active offshore sailor for most of my adult life having sailed a couple of Whitbread legs and way too many Bermuda races to mention!
Jesse Pariseau

Last week I talked about the dreaded polyester mite. However, I forgot to include its brother – the insidious Vinylester Mite. This mite is a far worse scourge than its brother. Unfortunately there is no known cure or remedy for this infectious bug. Continue reading

The Dreaded Sailboat Infestation!

The Dreaded Sailboat Infestation!

Jesse Pariseau

Jesse Pariseau

Director of Marketing & Sales at SlideMoor
I have been in the marine business since 1974. I have a BSEE from Northeastern University, specializing in Marine Sciences Instrumentation. I've been an active offshore sailor for most of my adult life having sailed a couple of Whitbread legs and way too many Bermuda races to mention!
Jesse Pariseau

This week we will discuss a strange little creature that infests boats. We all know how mold and rot are related. But did you know about other creatures that lurk in the shadows of the bilge, behind the galley stove and in the head? Yes, it’s the dreaded Polyester Mite otherwise known as Polyesteratum Miteism. This insidious creature has been known to dissolve and ingest fiberglass, leaving a fine white powder as a by-product. Continue reading

Tips on Sailboat Electrical Maintenance SlideMoor Blog

Tips on Sailboat Electrical Maintenance

Jesse Pariseau

Jesse Pariseau

Director of Marketing & Sales at SlideMoor
I have been in the marine business since 1974. I have a BSEE from Northeastern University, specializing in Marine Sciences Instrumentation. I've been an active offshore sailor for most of my adult life having sailed a couple of Whitbread legs and way too many Bermuda races to mention!
Jesse Pariseau

Sailboats have an especially high incidence of electrical terminal corrosion at the mast step. Some professionals advocate making up all wire-to-wire connections in a waterproof plastic box. I personally disagree, as there is really no such thing as a totally waterproof enclosure. They all leak at some point and the internal splices or terminal connections do end up corroding.  Continue reading

Sailing Trick to Calculate Set and Drift! - SlideMoor Blog

Sailing Trick to Calculate Set and Drift!

Jesse Pariseau

Jesse Pariseau

Director of Marketing & Sales at SlideMoor
I have been in the marine business since 1974. I have a BSEE from Northeastern University, specializing in Marine Sciences Instrumentation. I've been an active offshore sailor for most of my adult life having sailed a couple of Whitbread legs and way too many Bermuda races to mention!
Jesse Pariseau

How many times have you set a heading to a distant turning mark only to find that the closer you get, the further off the rhumb line you are? This trick requires a chart, or full sheet of paper. Draw the rhumb line course to the mark, noting the compass heading. Continue reading